FAQs


 

Who is a pediatric and adolescent gynecologist?

A pediatric and adolescent gynecologist (PAG) is a subspecialist who undergoes further preparation after first completing training in Obstetrics and Gynecology. Specifically caring for infants, children, adolescents, and young women ages 0-21 years with gynecologic concerns. It deals with a wide range of conditions in this population from ovarian cysts to congenital mullerian/reproductive anomalies. See our list of services for common conditions seen by a PAG provider.

 

When should my child see a gynecologist?

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that girls should have their first gynecologic visit between the ages of 13 years and 15 years. Even if your child is not having any gynecologic concerns, a check-in and preventative care visit is encouraged. Dr. Yemi will ask questions about overall gynecologic health and make sure that your child is developing normally and give information about how to stay healthy.

 

What should we expect at the initial visit?

The first visit may be just a talk between you and Dr. Yemi. She will tell you what to expect at future visits and get information about how to stay healthy. There may also be certain exams, most often a general physical exam and an external genitalia exam is performed. You usually do not need to have an internal  pelvic exam  at the first visit unless it is indicated by the complaint.

 

What is an external genitalia exam?

For the external genitalia exam, the doctor looks at the vulva. You can also have a mirror so that you can look at the vulva as well if you want. If you do not want to, that is ok. This exam is a good way to learn about your body and the names for each part.

 

Is it normal for me to be nervous about my first visit?

It is normal to feel nervous about your first visit. It may help if you talk about it with your parents or someone else you trust. Do not be afraid to let us know how you are feeling we can help put you at ease.

  

Should my child receive the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccine?

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a virus. Like all viruses, HPV causes infection by entering cells. HPV infection is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the United States. Most people who have sex will get an HPV infection at some point in their lives. HPV infections can cause different types of diseases such as genital warts, it can also cause changes in cells that can lead to cancer over time, including cancer of the cervix. Vaccination works best when it is done before a person is sexually active and exposed to HPV. But vaccination can still reduce the risk of getting HPV for people who have already been sexually active. The ideal age for HPV vaccination of girls and boys is 11 or 12, but it can be given starting at age 9. The vaccine is safe and effective and protects against the HPV types that are the most common cause of genital warts and cancer. Millions of people around the world have gotten the HPV vaccine without serious side effects. The vaccine does not contain live viruses, so it cannot cause an HPV infection. 

 

When should cervical cancer screening begin?

Cervical cancer screening is used to find changes in the cells of the cervix that could lead to cancer. Screening includes cervical cytology (also called the Pap test or Pap smear), testing for human papillomavirus (HPV), or both. Recommendations suggest that this testing should begin at age 21 years.  

 

Can I schedule an appointment for the weekend?

Yes, we offer some Saturday appointments. Call the clinic at 281 803 8724 for Saturday appointments, our scheduling coordinators will be happy to help. For week-day appointments, you can call the clinic or book online. Virtual appointments are also available  

Location
Texas Pediatric & Adolescent Gynecology
1111 Highway 6, Suite 155
Sugar Land, TX 77478
Phone: 281-789-6318
Fax: 281-803-8956
Office Hours

Get in touch

281-789-6318